Ai Hasegawa

I Wanna Deliver A Shark

This project approaches the problem of human reproduction in an age of over-population and environmental crisis. With potential food shortages and a population of nearly nine billion people, would a new mother consider incubating and giving birth to an endangered species such as a shark, tuna or dolphin? This project introduces a new argument for giving birth to our food to satisfy our demands for nutrition and childbirth and discusses some of the technical details of how that might be possible.

We are genetically predisposed to raise children as a way of passing on our genes to the next generation but we live in an age where the struggle to raise a child in decent conditions is becoming harder with gross over-population and difficult environmental conditions.

We must also eat, and we are equally facing growing food shortages as a result of over-fishing, land use and a growing population. By giving birth to an edible animal it might place more value on that endangered species and help prevent it’s extinction. But, would raising this animal as a child change it’s value so drastically that we would be unable to consume it because it would be imbued with the love of motherhood?

Special Thanks
Dr Mark H Sullivan, Imperial College London.

Credits
Embryologist, Anastasia Mania.

Website
Ai Hasegawa

programme information projects
Spiny dogfish embryo in the human female womb. The bladder supplies urine to artificial pregnancy system through the tube. Spiny dogfish embryo in the human female womb. The bladder supplies urine to artificial pregnancy system through the tube.
Would you deliver a shark? Would you deliver a shark?